History

Norway

1. Alexander Kristoff

Germany

2. John Degenkolb

Belgium

3. Oliver Naesen

  • Netherlands
    4. Mathieu Van Der Poel
  • Netherlands
    5. Danny Van Poppel
  • France
    6. Adrian Petit
  • Italy
    7. Matteo Trentin
  • Germany
    8. Rüdiger Selig
  • Slovenia
    9. Matej Mohoric
  • Belgium
    10. Jens Debusschere
  • Denmark
    11. Søren Kragh Andersen
  • Spain
    12. Carlos Barbero
  • Belgium
    13. Tiesj Benoot
  • France
    14. Anthony Turgis
  • Belgium
    15. Jens Keukeleire
Year 11 22 33
2019
NO
Alexander Kristoff
DE
John Degenkolb
BE
Oliver Naesen
2018
SK
Peter Sagan
IT
Elia Viviani
FR
Arnaud Demare
2017
BE
Greg Van Avermaet
BE
Jens Keukeleire
SK
Peter Sagan
2016
SK
Peter Sagan
BE
Sep Vanmarcke
RU
Viacheslav Kuznetsov
2015
IT
Luca Paolini
NL
Niki Tepstra
GB
Geraint Thomas
2014
DE
John Degenkolb
FR
Arnaud Démare
SK
Peter Sagan
2013
SK
Peter Sagan
SI
Borut Bozic
BE
Greg Van Avermaet
2012
BE
Tom Boonen
SK
Peter Sagan
DK
Matti Breschel
2011
BE
Tom Boonen
IT
Daniele Bennati
US
Tyler Farrar
2010
AT
Bernhard Eisel
BE
Sep Vanmarcke
BE
Philippe Gilbert
2009
NO
Edvald Boasson Hagen
BY
Aleksandr Kuschynski
AU
Matthew Goss
2008
ES
Oscar Freire
CH
Aurélien Clerc
BE
Wouter Weylandt
2007
DE
Marcus burghardt
GB
Roger Hammond
ES
Oscar Freire
2006
NO
Thor Hushovd
DE
David Kopp
IT
Alessandro Petacchi
2005
BE
Nico Mattan
ES
Juan-Antonio Flecha
IT
Daniele Bennati
2004
BE
Tom Boonen
SE
Magnus Backstedt
EE
Jaan Kirsipuu
2003
DE
Andreas Klier
AU
Henk Vogels
BE
Tom Boonen
2002
IT
Mario Cipollini
US
Fred Rodriguez
US
George Hincapie
2001
US
George Hincapie
NL
Leon Van Bon
DE
Steffen Wesemann
2000
BE
Geert Van Bondt
BE
Peter Van Petegem
BE
Johan Museeuw
1999
BE
Tom Steels
PL
Zbigniew Spruch
NL
Tristan Hoffman
1998
BE
Frank Vandenbroucke
DK
Lars Michaelsen
BE
Nico Mattan
1997
FR
Philippe Gaumont
MD
Andrei Tchmil
BE
Johan Capiot
1996
BE
Tom Steels
IT
Giovanni Lombardi
IT
Fabio Baldato
1995
DK
Lars Michaelsen
IT
Maurizio Fondriest
BE
Luc Roosen
1994
BE
Wilfried Peeters
IT
Franco Ballerini
BE
Johan Museeuw
1993
IT
Mario Cipollini
BE
Eric Vanderaerden
UZ
Djamolidine Abdoujaparov
1992
IT
Mario Cipollini
BE
Johan Capiot
IT
Adriano Baffi
1991
UZ
Djamolidine Abdoujaparov
IT
Mario Cipollini
DE
Olaf Ludwig
1990
BE
Herman Frison
BE
Johan Museeuw
IT
Franco Ballerini
1989
NL
Gerrit Solleveld
GB
Sean Yates
DK
Rolf Sørensen
1988
IE
Sean Kelly
IT
Gianno Bugno
US
Ron Kiefel
1987
NL
Teun Van Vliet
BE
Etienne De Wilde
BE
Herman Frison
1986
IT
Guido Bontempi
NL
Twan Poels
BE
Jean-Marie Wampers
1985
BE
Eric Vanderaerden
AU
Phil Anderson
BE
Rudy Dhaenens
1984
IT
Guido Bontempi
BE
Eric Vanderaerden
IT
Pierino Gavazzi
1983
NL
Leo van Vliet
NL
Jan Raas
BE
Frank Hoste
1982
BE
Frank Hoste
BE
Eddy Vanhaerens
BE
Alfons De Wolf
1981
NL
Jan Raas
BE
Roger De Vlaeminck
BE
Alfons De Wolf
1980
NL
Henk Lubberding
BE
Alfons De Wolf
NL
Piet van Katwijk
1979
IT
Francesco Moser
BE
Roger De Vlaeminck
NL
Jan Raas
1978
BE
Ferdi Van den Haute
BE
Walter Planckaert
IT
Francesco Moser
1977
FR
Bernard Hinault
IT
Vittorio Algeri
NL
Piet van Katwijk
1976
BE
Freddy Maertens
BE
Rik Van Linden
BE
Frans Verbeeck
1975
BE
Freddy Maertens
BE
Frans Verbeeck
BE
Rik van Linden
1974
GB
Barry Hoban
BE
Eddy Merckx
BE
Roger De Vlaeminck
1973
BE
Eddy Merckx
BE
Frans Verbeeck
BE
Walter Planckaert
1972
BE
Roger Swerts
IT
Felice Gimondi
BE
Eddy Merckx
1971
BE
Georges Pintens
BE
Roger De Vlaeminck
NL
Gerben Karstens
1970
BE
Eddy Merckx
BE
Wily Vekemans
BE
Walter Godefroot
1969
BE
Willy Vekemans
BE
Roger De Vlaeminck
BE
Eric De Vlaeminck
1968
BE
Walter Godefroot
BE
Willy Vanneste
IT
Felice Gimondi
1967
BE
Eddy Merckx
NL
Jan Janssen
BE
Edward Sels
1966
BE
Herman Vanspringel
BE
Noël Vanclooster
DK
Palle Lykke Jensen
1965
BE
Noël De Pauw
BE
Bernard Vandekerckhove
BE
Gustaaf Desmet
1964
FR
Jacques Anquetil
BE
Yvo Molenaers
BE
Rik Van Looy
1963
BE
Benoni Beheyt
GB
Tom Simpson
BE
Michel Van Aerde
1962
BE
Rik Van Looy
BE
Frans Schoubben
BE
Armand Desmet
1961
BE
Frans Aerenhouts
BE
Raymond Impanis
BE
Yvo Molenaers
1960
BE
Frans Aerenhouts
BE
Frans De Mulder
BE
Jozef Planckaert
1959
BE
Léon Van Daele
BE
Joseph Hoevenaars
FR
Jacques Anquetil
1958
BE
Noël Foré
BE
Rik Van Looy
BE
Fred De Bruyne
1957
BE
Rik Van Looy
BE
André Noyelle
BE
Lucien Mathys
1956
BE
Rik Van Looy
BE
Richard Van Genechten
BE
Désiré Keteleer
1955
BE
Briek Schotte
BE
Désiré Keteleer
BE
Raymond Impanis
1954
CH
Rolf Graf
CH
Ferdinand Kübler
BE
Ernest Sterckx
1953
BE
Raymond Impanis
NL
Wim Van Est
BE
Germain Derycke
1952
BE
Raymond Impanis
BE
Maurice Blomme
BE
Aloïs De Hertog
1951
BE
André Rosseel
BE
Raphaël Jonckheere
BE
Lionel Van Brabant
1950
BE
Briek Schotte
BE
Albert Decin
BE
André Declerq
1949
BE
Marcel Kint
BE
André Declerq
BE
Albert Decin
1948
BE
Valère Ollivier
BE
Albert Ramon
BE
Hilaire Couvreur
1947
BE
Maurice De simpelaere
BE
René Beyens
BE
Lucien Vlaemynck
1946
BE
Ernest Sterckx
BE
Maurice Desimpelaere
BE
Michel Remue
1945
BE
Robert Van Eenaeme
BE
Maurice Van Herzele
BE
André Declerck
1939
BE
André Declerck
BE
Frans Van Hellemont
BE
Albert Van Laecke
1938
BE
Hubert Godart
BE
Edmond Delathouwer
BE
Gustaaf Van Cauwenberghe
1937
BE
Robert Van Eenaeme
BE
Albert Ritserveldt
BE
André Hallaert
1936
BE
Robert Van Eenaeme
BE
Jozef Somers
BE
Gaston Denijs
1935
BE
Albert Depreitere
BE
Jérôme Dufromont
BE
Karel Catrysse
1934
BE
Gustaaf Van Belle
BE
Maurice Vandenberghe
BE
Jerome Dufromont

There’s no need to be embarrassed if you’ve never heard of Robert van Eenaeme. And yet, alongside Rik Van Looy, Eddy Merckx, Mario Cipollini, Tom Boonen and Peter Sagan, he belongs to the select group of riders who have won the Gent-Wevelgem on three separate occasions.

Rik, Eddy, Mario, Tom & Peter managed to do it as professionals, while Van Eenaeme managed it twice as an independent rider and once as a professional. Without a doubt it was this last victory that caused the biggest splash. Roughly a week after the Gent-Wevelgem, a newspaper published a photograph with the caption ‘The photographer as race umpire’. This photo revealed that it was not Maurice Van Herzele but rather Robert van Eenaeme who had won the seventh edition of the Gent-Wevelgem by a hair.

Ten days later, the legendary native of Wondelgem was given the victory by the cycling federation. Bob died in Marche-en-Famenne, on 8th March 1959, barely 43 years of age, following a road accident.

On 3rd September 1953, Rik van Looy raced in his first professional race in Kortenaken, which also gave him his first victory. Nevertheless, Rik still had to wait the best part of three years before adding a genuine classic to his trophy cabinet. Just like a number of other champions, he then won the Gent-Wevelgem (1956). In 1962, Rik reigned over cycling with the air of an emperor, earning him the nickname of Keizer (Emperor). With success in the Tour of Flanders, Gent-Wevelgem and the Paris-Roubaix, Van Looy achieved a hat-trick that nobody had managed before him (and which nobody has managed since). In perfect physical condition each spring, for almost two decades the Keizer was one of the main attractions of the Gent-Wevelgem. Just take a look at his performances. 1951: tenth among debutants, 1952 and 1953: withdrawal from the amateur race, and then with the professionals, in 1954: withdrawal following a technical issue, 1955: twenty-ninth, 1956 and 1957: first, 1958: second, 1959: twelfth, 1960: did not participate, 1961: sixty first, 1962: first, 1963: eighth, 1964: third, 1965: fifteenth, 1966: twenty second, 1967: thirty fourth, 1968: eighth, 1969: tenth, 1970: withdrawal. An impressive record. .
 

Fate combined athletic and intellectual ability in one man: Eddy Merckx. Any self-respecting race organiser dreams of seeing the greatest rider of all time appear on the list of winners for their race. And when you’re able to manage this achievement three times, as is the case with the Gent-Wevelgem, the race’s reputation is given an enormous boost. At professional level, in 12 appearances, “The Cannibal” made it to the podium on no fewer than five occasions. The first time, he was barely 21 when he saw off Holland’s Jan Janssen at the end of a breath-taking sprint. Three years later, just 3 km from the finishing line, he managed to distance himself from the other breakaway cyclists and another three years later, after a stalemate, he settled the score with the milkman Frans Verbeeck. Just as impressive, the results never lie. 1964: fourth among amateurs and then among the professionals, 1966: ninth, 1967: first, 1968: ninth, 1969: did not participate, 1970: first, 1971: fourteenth, 1972: third, 1973: first, 1974: second, 1975: sixth, and tenth in 1976. At professional level, the Brussels native finished in the top ten nine times. Nobody had done it before him and nobody has managed it since.

Gent-Wevelgem, 1992 edition, after Abdoujaparov was disqualified, Mario Cipollini was declared winner. Gent-Wevelgem, 1993 edition, Super Mario’s dream of winning it outright after another sprint became reality. Nine years later, the fastest sprinter of his generation was celebrating once again in the Vanackerstraat. This time it wasn’t at the end of a long sprint, but after a close race with the other breakaway riders. On the treacherous disguised incline between Kemmel and Wijtschate, Cipo had the longest sprint of his career, despite a strong wind blowing against him. After a pursuit of several kilometres, he managed on his own to catch up with Fred Rodriguez, George Hincapie, Hendrik Van Dyck and Martin Hvastija. During the sprint, he even had enough time to lift his arms to the heavens to show off his magnificent black and white jersey. Six months later, the eccentric native of Tuscany would experience the greatest day of his career. Given the right support by the squadra azzurra during the World Championships in Zolder, he opened up a lead of 150 m – just enough to become World Champion. A former winner of the Gent-Wevelgem and former World Champion, the two have always gone well together.

Needing no introduction, Tom Boonen is without a doubt the most popular Belgian rider of his generation. Although the Campine native had set his sights on winning the E3 Grand Prix for the fifth time in 2011, his manager Patrick Lefevere decided that it was in the best interests of his team for him to take the lead on the Gent-Wevelgem, a race that he admits to not being a massive fan of. Regardless, he managed to prepare himself mentally, and not without success. During a particularly captivating 73rd edition, Boonen was given the perfect platform by his teammates. Steegmans took him to within 300 m of the finish line for a final sprint where he saw off the challenge of world-class sprinters such as Daniele Bennati, Tyler Ferrar and André Greipel. Only the very best can manage to win races they don’t like. Seven years earlier, Boonen had already taken his place at the top of the podium in the Vanackerstraat, with Magnus Backstedt and Jaan Kirsipuu his main challengers at the time.

Peter Sagan has already occupied all places on the podium of Gent-Wevelgem. In 2012 he became second after Tom Boonen, who won his third Gent-Wevelgem. The next year he showed his power by finishing solo in an icy edition of Gent-Wevelgem. In addition, he treated the fans with a wheelie. It was the first highlight in his career. In 2014 he ended third. The German John Degenkolb en Frenchman Arnaud Démare beat him in the sprint.

Without a doubt the highlight in his young career was the World Championship in 2015, where he delivered a masterclass of attacking and became world champion for the first time. It took him six months to win another race. Again he was the fastest in Wevelgem. 54 years after Rik Van Looy a ruling World Champion again took the flowers home. In 2017 the Slovakian stood for the 5th time on the podium, again wearing the rainbow jersey. He finished third after Greg van Avermaet and Jens Keukeleire. Six months later Sagan won the world championship for the third time in a row. In 2018 Sagan won again in Wevelgem and became shared record-holder. Winning twice in the rainbow jersey and finishing 6 times on the podium: will someone ever beat this?